Sever’s Disease

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s Disease

Thomas A. LeBeau

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

Growing pains may sound like an old wives’ tale. In the case of Sever’s disease, though, your child’s growth spurt can lead to serious pain. It’s not actually a disease but a heel injury.

What Causes It?

During a growth spurt, your child’s heel bone grows faster than the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in her leg. In fact, the heel is one of your child’s first body parts to reach full adult size. When the muscles and tendons can’t grow fast enough to keep up, they are stretched too tight.

If your child is very active, especially if she plays a sport that involves a lot of running and jumping on hard surfaces (such as soccer, basketball, or gymnastics), it can put extra strain on her already overstretched tendons. This leads to swelling and pain at the point where the tendons attach to the growing part of her heel.

How Does It Affect Your Child?

Sever’s disease is more common in boys. They tend to have later growth spurts and typically get the condition between the ages of 10 and 15. In girls, it usually happens between 8 and 13.

Symptoms can include:

  • Pain, swelling, or redness in one or both heels
  • Tenderness and tightness in the back of the heel that feels worse when the area is squeezed
  • Heel pain that gets worse after running or jumping, and feels better after rest. The pain may be especially bad at the beginning of a sports season or when wearing hard, stiff shoes like soccer cleats.
  • Trouble walking
  • Walking or running with a limp or on tip toes

How Is It Treated?

The good news is that Sever’s disease doesn’t cause any long-term foot problems. Symptoms typically go away after a few months.

The best treatment is simply rest. Your child will need to stop or cut down on sports until the pain gets better. When she’s well enough to return to her sport, have her build up her playing time gradually.

Your doctor may also recommend:

  • Ice packs or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or naproxen, to relieve the pain
  • Supportive shoes and inserts that reduce stress on the heel bone. These can help if your child has another foot problem that aggravates Sever’s disease, such as flat feet or high arches.
  • Stretching and strengthening exercises, perhaps with the help of a physical therapist
  • In severe cases, your child may need a cast so her heel is forced to rest.

Can It Be Prevented?

Once your child’s growth spurt ends, and she’s reached full size, her Sever’s disease won’t return. Until then, the condition can happen again if your child stays very active.

Some simple steps can help prevent it. Have your child:

  • Wear supportive, shock-absorbing shoes.
  • Stretch her calves, heels, and hamstrings.
  • Not overdo it. Warn against over-training, and suggest plenty of rest, especially if she begins to feel pain in her heel.
  • Try to avoid lots of running and pounding on hard surfaces.
  • If she’s overweight, help her lose those extra pounds, which can increase pressure on her heels.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help your child with their heel pain and get them back to their regular activity. If you suspect your child has Sever’s disease or heel pain of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible at (904) 824-0869 or feel  free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

Broken Toe

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We are here to help with your broken toe.
We are here to help with your broken toe.

 

Broken Toe

Thomas A. LeBeau

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

What causes a broken toe (fracture), and what are the symptoms?

You may get a broken toe by stubbing it, dropping something on it, or bending it. A hairline crack (stress fracture) may occur after a sudden increase in activity, such as increased running or walking.

Symptoms of a broken toe may include:

  • A snap or pop at the time of the injury.
  • Pain that is worse when the toe is moved or touched.
  • Swelling and bruising.
  • Possible deformity (not just swelling), such as a toe pointing in the wrong direction or that is twisted out of normal position. A dislocated toe can also look deformed.
  • Decreased movement or movement that causes pain.

How is a broken toe diagnosed?

A broken toe is diagnosed through a physical examination. Your health professional will look for swelling, purple or black and blue spots, and tenderness. An X-ray may be needed to determine whether the toe is broken or dislocated.

How is it treated?

Home care after breaking a toe includes applying ice, elevating the foot, and rest. Medical treatment for a broken toe depends on which toe is broken, where in the toe the break is, and the severity of the break. If you do not have diabetes or peripheral arterial disease, your toe can be buddy-taped to your uninjured toe next to it. Protect the skin by putting some soft padding, such as felt or foam, between your toes before you tape them together. Your injured toe may need to be buddy-taped for 2 to 4 weeks to heal. If your injured toe hurts more after buddy taping it, remove the tape.

In rare cases, other treatment may be needed, including:

  • Protecting the toe from additional injury. This may include using splints to stabilize the toe, a short leg cast, or a brace.
    • Surgery, if the break is severe.

Medical treatment is needed more often for a broken big toe than for the other toes. An untreated fracture may cause long-term pain, limited movement, and deformity.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help with your broken toe and get you back to your regular activity. If you suspect you have a broken toe or are feeling pain in your foot or lower leg of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment at (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

 

 

Broken Ankle

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We are here to help with your broken ankle.
We are here to help with your broken ankle.

Broken Ankle

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

Ankle injuries are among the most common of the bone and joint injuries. Often, the degree of pain, the inability to walk, may indicate that you have a broken ankle. This might cause you to seek care in an emergency situation.

For the most part, your concern is the same as the doctor’s: Is it a broken ankle? It is often impossible to diagnose a broken ankle rather than a sprain, a dislocation, or tendon injury without X-rays of the ankle.

Signs and symptoms of a broken ankle tend to be obvious. Pain is the most common complaint. Swelling frequently occurs around the ankle too. You may see bruising (“black and blue”) about the joint, although not immediately. This bruising can track down toward the sole of your foot or toward the toes. In severe fractures you may see obvious deformities of bones around the ankle.

When you have a broken ankle, there several things you can look for to determine whether or not you need to see your doctor or go to an emergency department. The following situations warrant seeing your doctor as soon as possible:

  • You cannot bear weight on the ankle.
  • Your pain remains intolerable despite using over-the-counter pain medications.
  • Home care fails to reduce your pain.

When a doctor evaluates your broken ankle, the main task is to determine if you have fractured a bone or if the joint has been damaged sufficiently to have become unstable. Joint instability often suggests multiple fractures, a fracture with a ligament injury, or sometimes ligament injury alone. If the doctor suspects a broken bone, he or she will ask for ankle X-rays and MRI. The doctor may also ask for X-rays or MRI of your knee, shin, or foot, depending on where the pain is.

If surgery is not required, the type of fracture and the stability of your joint will determine the type of splint or cast that will be used and how long it will need to be in place. If your bones are not aligned properly, the doctor may realign them before placing the splint or cast. Some minor broken ankle scenarios do not require a splint or cast. In these cases the fracture will be managed as an ankle sprain.

After the swelling decreases and you are reexamined, foot doctor / podiatrist may place a better-fitting cast or splint on the ankle. Depending on the type of broken ankle, you may be placed in a walking cast, which can bear some weight, or you may still need a non-weight-bearing cast that will require the use of crutches to help you walk. Follow-up care for an ankle fracture depends on the severity of the fracture. The average broken ankle requires 4-8 weeks for the bone to heal.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help with your broken Ankle and get you back to your regular activity. If you suspect you have a broken ankle or are feeling pain in your ankle of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible at (904) 824-0869 or feel  free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

Ankle Therapy Part 3

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I have some great ankle therapy exercises for you!
I have some great ankle therapy exercises for you!

Ankle Physical Therapy

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

Longevity Physical Therapy St. Augustine

This is the third and final part in a 3 part series covering ankle therapy for an ankle injury. These are exercises you can do at home but it is recommended that you see a podiatrist and physical therapist to start your recovery. Longevity Physical Therapy St. Augustine is the preferred physical therapy practice of Dr. Thomas LeBeau and St. Augustine Foot and Ankle.

Partial Weight-Bearing Exercises
These ankle therapy exercises will help put more weight on the injured foot as well as strengthen it. Each one should be performed 10 times in a row.

Seated Calf Raise

  1. Sit in a chair with the injured foot on the floor.
  2. Lift your heel as far as possible while keeping your toes on the floor.
  3. Return heel to the floor.

Single Leg Stand

  1. Stand upright while holding onto a stable object.
  2. Shift some of your weight onto the injured foot.
  1. Hold the position for 15 seconds.
  2. Relax and put your weight back onto your uninjured foot.

Full Weight-Bearing Exercises
These ankle therapy exercises will help put more weight on the injured foot as well as strengthen it. Perform each one 10 times in a row.

Single Leg Stance

  1. Stand on the injured foot while lifting the uninjured foot off the ground.
  2. Hold the position for 15 seconds.
  3. Relax and put your weight back onto your uninjured foot.

Standing Calf Raise

  1. Stand on the injured foot while lifting the uninjured foot off the ground.
  2. Raise up, standing only on the ball of the injured foot and lifting your heel off the ground.
  1. Hold the position for 15 seconds.
  2. Relax and put your weight back onto your uninjured foot.

Lateral Stepping

(Increase the speed of this ankle therapy exercise as your healing progresses.)

  1. Place a rolled towel or short object on the ground to the side of your injured foot.
  2. Step over the towel with the injured foot and remain on that foot.
  3. Then bring the uninjured foot over the object and stand on both feet.
  4. Step back over the towel with the uninjured foot and remain on that foot.
  5. Then bring the injured foot back over the towel and stand on both feet.

Lateral Jump

(Increase the speed of this ankle therapy exercise as your healing progresses.)

  1. Place a rolled towel or short object on the ground to the side of your injured foot.
  2. Hop over the towel and land on the injured foot.
  3. Then hop back over the towel and land on the uninjured foot.

Balance Activities
Injury to ankles can often result in decreased balance ability. Towards the end of your rehabilitation performing balance activities is an important way to prevent future injury. Perform this ankle therapy exercise 10 times in a row.

Single Leg Stance on a Towel

  1. Fold a towel into a small rectangle and place on the ground.
  2. Stand with the injured foot on the towel.
  3. Lift the uninjured leg off the ground standing only on the towel with the injured leg.
  1. Hold for 15 seconds. (As balance improves, increase stance time on injured leg up to 45 seconds.)
  2. Return your uninjured foot to the floor.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle and Longevity Physical Therapy we will do everything we can to help with your ankle injury. If you suspect you have an ankle injury, require ankle physical therapy, or are feeling pain in your ankle or foot please give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible at (904) 824-0869 or feel  free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com