Plantar Fasciitis “The Scoop”

plantar fasciitis
Dr. Thomas LeBeau seeing a patient for plantar fasciitis.

Safe, reliable relief from disabling foot pain (Plantar fasciitis).

With heel pain or plantar fasciitis, also known as foot pain, the bottom of your foot may hurt when you stand, especially after you get out of bed first thing in the morning. Without a heel pain diagnosis and heel pain treatment, plantar fasciitis can lead to painful heel spurs and chronic disabling pain. Over-pronation (flatfeet) is the leading cause of heal pain. Your arch can collapse from weight-bearing, causing the plantar fascia to stretch away from the heel bone. When you stand, your plantar fascia is pulled tight like a bowstring. During a long rest, the plantar fascia contracts back to its original shape and your pain is reduced.

Heal Pain can be caused by any number of things including poorly fitting shoes, over use (too much walking or running), barefoot walking or running, being over-weight, a foot injury, and/or genetics among other things. Untreated foot pain could also lead to other discomfort such as knee pain, hip pain, and back pain. Getting help and relief from plantar fasciitis and/or heel pain is key to avoiding other uncomfortable and painful issues.

Plantar fasciitis is also called heel spur syndrome. It can be treated by using a variety of conservative approaches such as anti-inflammatory medicines, orthotic shoe inserts and foot physical therapy modalities (heat, ice, massage and therapeutic exercise). Any number or combination of conservative treatments could relieve you of your pain.

With the experience and skill of podiatrist Thomas A. LeBeau, DPM and his staff at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle, you could walk away from plantar fasciitis without surgery. Getting you back on your feet is the top priority. So for lasting relief, call 904-824-0869. Please feel free to use our online ‘Request an Appointment’ form.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s Disease

Thomas A. LeBeau

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

Growing pains may sound like an old wives’ tale. In the case of Sever’s disease, though, your child’s growth spurt can lead to serious pain. It’s not actually a disease but a heel injury.

What Causes It?

During a growth spurt, your child’s heel bone grows faster than the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in her leg. In fact, the heel is one of your child’s first body parts to reach full adult size. When the muscles and tendons can’t grow fast enough to keep up, they are stretched too tight.

If your child is very active, especially if she plays a sport that involves a lot of running and jumping on hard surfaces (such as soccer, basketball, or gymnastics), it can put extra strain on her already overstretched tendons. This leads to swelling and pain at the point where the tendons attach to the growing part of her heel.

How Does It Affect Your Child?

Sever’s disease is more common in boys. They tend to have later growth spurts and typically get the condition between the ages of 10 and 15. In girls, it usually happens between 8 and 13.

Symptoms can include:

  • Pain, swelling, or redness in one or both heels
  • Tenderness and tightness in the back of the heel that feels worse when the area is squeezed
  • Heel pain that gets worse after running or jumping, and feels better after rest. The pain may be especially bad at the beginning of a sports season or when wearing hard, stiff shoes like soccer cleats.
  • Trouble walking
  • Walking or running with a limp or on tip toes

How Is It Treated?

The good news is that Sever’s disease doesn’t cause any long-term foot problems. Symptoms typically go away after a few months.

The best treatment is simply rest. Your child will need to stop or cut down on sports until the pain gets better. When she’s well enough to return to her sport, have her build up her playing time gradually.

Your doctor may also recommend:

  • Ice packs or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or naproxen, to relieve the pain
  • Supportive shoes and inserts that reduce stress on the heel bone. These can help if your child has another foot problem that aggravates Sever’s disease, such as flat feet or high arches.
  • Stretching and strengthening exercises, perhaps with the help of a physical therapist
  • In severe cases, your child may need a cast so her heel is forced to rest.

Can It Be Prevented?

Once your child’s growth spurt ends, and she’s reached full size, her Sever’s disease won’t return. Until then, the condition can happen again if your child stays very active.

Some simple steps can help prevent it. Have your child:

  • Wear supportive, shock-absorbing shoes.
  • Stretch her calves, heels, and hamstrings.
  • Not overdo it. Warn against over-training, and suggest plenty of rest, especially if she begins to feel pain in her heel.
  • Try to avoid lots of running and pounding on hard surfaces.
  • If she’s overweight, help her lose those extra pounds, which can increase pressure on her heels.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help your child with their heel pain and get them back to their regular activity. If you suspect your child has Sever’s disease or heel pain of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible at (904) 824-0869 or feel  free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

Plantar Fasciitis

source ; http://www.staugustinefoot.com/blog/?p=399

Plantar Fasciitis
We can help you with your Plantar Fasciitis and foot pain!

Plantar Fasciitis: Foot Pain

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

How Do I Know If I Have Plantar Fasciitis?

Most cases of Plantar Fasciitis are diagnosed by a health care provider based on your symptoms and a physical exam in which he or she will press on the bottom of your feet — the area most likely to be painful in plantar fasciitis, inflammation of the thick, fibrous band of tissue (”fascia”) that reaches from the heel to the toes and supports the muscles and arch of the foot. He or she may suggest that you have an X-ray of your foot to verify that there is no stress fracture causing your pain.

What Are the Treatments for Plantar Fasciitis?

Most health care providers agree that initial treatment for plantar fasciitis should be quite conservative. You’ll probably be advised to avoid exercise that is making your pain worse. Your doctor may also advise one or more of these treatment options:

A Heel Pad

A heel pad is sometimes used to cushion the painful heel if you spend a great deal of time on your feet on hard surfaces.

Also, over-the-counter or custom-made orthotics, which fit inside your shoes, may be constructed to address specific imbalances you may have with foot placement or gait.

Stretching

Stretching exercises performed three to five times a day can help elongate the heel cord and the ligaments on the bottom of the foot.

Ice

You may be advised to apply ice packs to your heel or to use an ice block to massage the plantar fascia before going to bed each night.

Pain Relievers

Simple over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, are often helpful in decreasing inflammation and pain. To avoid stomach discomfort, NSAIDs should be taken with meals. If you can’t tolerate such drugs, ask your health care provider about an alternative.

A Night Splint

A night splint is sometimes used to hold your foot at a specific angle, which prevents the plantar fascia from contracting during sleep.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound physical therapy can be performed to decrease inflammation and promote healing.

Steroid Injections

Anti-inflammatory steroid injections directly into the tissue around your heel may be helpful. However, if these injections are used too many times, you may suffer other complications, such as shrinking of the fat pad of your heel, which you need for insulation and cushioning. Loss of the fat pad could actually increase your pain — or could even rupture the plantar fascia in rare cases.

What Are the Treatments for Plantar Fasciitis? continued…

Walking Cast

If your plantar fasciitis is unresponsive to typical treatments, your doctor may recommend that you wear a short walking cast for about three weeks. This ensures that your foot is held in a position that allows the plantar fascia to heal in a stretched, rather than shortened, position.

Shock Wave Therapy

Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is a procedure that may be performed prior to considering open surgery, if your symptoms have persisted for more than six months. This surgery does not involve any actual incisions being made; rather, it uses a high intensity shock wave to stimulate healing of the plantar fascia.

Surgery for Plantar Fasciitis

Most practitioners agree that treatment for Plantar Fasciitis is a slow process. Improvement usually takes six to 12 weeks, and the condition may still linger, at a lower level of pain, for up to six months or longer. If these more conservative measures don’t provide relief in a reasonable length of time, your doctor may suggest surgical options.

The most common surgery for Plantar Fasciitis is called a plantar fascia release, which involves releasing a portion of the plantar fascia from the heel bone. A plantar fascia release can be performed as a traditional surgery through a regular incision, or as endoscopic surgery, in which a tiny incision allows a miniature scope to be inserted and surgery to be performed.

About one in 20 patients with Plantar Fasciitis will need surgery. As with any surgery, there is a chance that you will continue to have pain afterwards.

How Can I Prevent Plantar Fasciitis?

While there are no sure ways to prevent Plantar Fasciitis, these prevention tips may be helpful:

  • Keep your weight under reasonable control.
  • Wear comfortable, supportive shoes.
  • Use care when starting or intensifying exercise programs.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help you with your Plantar Fasciitis  and/0r foot pain to keep your feet healthy and functioning. If you are experience foot pain of any kind give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible at (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com