Diabetes: Check Your Feet!

017Diabetes: Check Your Feet!

Thomas A. LeBeau

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

When you have diabetes, you need to examine your feet every day. Be sure to look at all areas of your feet, including your toes. It may be helpful to use a handheld mirror or a magnifying mirror attached to the bathroom wall near the baseboard to inspect your feet. If you can’t see well, have someone else use this Diabetes Foot Checklist to examine your feet for you. Using this Diabetes Foot Checklist helps you remember to examine all areas of your feet.

Diabetes Foot Checklist
Check your feet for: What to do if you notice a problem
Skin color:

·         Red

·         Blue or black

·         Redness could point to irritation from shoes, overheating or other early signs of a problem. Do what you can to discover the cause so you can fix it, such as wearing shoes that fit better.

·         Blue or black areas can mean bruising or blood flow problems. Call your doctor to report them.

Patches where hair is missing Bald patches may mean irritation from shoes or a blood flow problem. Show the areas to your doctor during your next visit.
Blister ·         Try to discover the cause of the blister. Friction or rubbing against your skin causes blisters. You may need new shoes.

·         Do not break the blister or open it yourself. Leave the skin over the blister intact.

·         Cover the blister with a sterile, nonstick dressing and paper tape.

·         Call your doctor if any blister becomes red, oozes, or is not healing after 4 days.

Break in your skin ·         Gently wash the area with mild soap; blot it dry and cover it with a sterile, nonstick dressing.

·         Call your doctor if any break in the skin becomes red, oozes, or is not healing after 4 days.

Note: Examine the underside of your toes and the area between the toes for breaks in the skin.

Calluses (hardened areas of skin) and corns (pressure sores, usually found on or between toes) Show the area to your doctor at your next visit. This is very important.

·         Do not use products sold in drugstores to remove corns, calluses, or other problems.

·         Don’t use a pumice stone on calluses unless your doctor or foot doctor (podiatrist) shows you how to use it properly.

·         No cutting, filing, or anything that may break the skin on your feet.

Peeling skin or tiny blisters between your toes or cracking and oozing of the skin This may be athlete’s foot. Treating athlete’s foot early can prevent serious foot infections. See the topic Athlete’s Foot for more information.

·         To prevent athlete’s foot, wear shower shoes or bathing shoes when you use public showers or pools. Otherwise, keep feet dry.

·         Keep feet clean. Wear clean socks every day.

·         Do not treat athlete’s foot without first seeing your doctor or podiatrist.

Moisture between your toes Dry between your toes well. Moisture between your toes provides a good place for bacteria and fungi to grow, causing infection.
Feelings of numbness, burning, or “pins and needles” If you have new numbness or tingling in your feet that does not go away after changing position, call your foot doctor.
Sore (ulcer) Do not try to treat a foot ulcer at home. Call your foot doctor immediately. If you check your feet regularly, you usually will see a problem before it becomes an ulcer.
Ingrown toenail Do not treat an ingrown toenail at home. Call your foot doctor for an appointment.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help you manage your diabetes and keep your feet healthy. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms in the checklist above or are feeling pain in your foot or lower leg of any kind please come see us as soon as possible. Give us a call to set an appointment at (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

Nerve Pain Treatment: Neurogenx

source ;  http://www.staugustinefoot.com/2016/04/25/nerve-pain-treatment-neurogenx/

Nerve Pain Treatment: Neurogenx  

Thomas A. LeBeau

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

What is the Neurogenx nerve pain treatment?

It is a breakthrough electromedical nerve pain treatment proven to effectively alleviate the pain, tingling, burning, and numbness resulting from neuropathy and chronic nerve conditions. This nerve pain treatment can successfully help resolve neuropathy symptoms and nerve pain of varying intensities in different areas of the body. Neurogenx patients have improved sensation, range of motion, balance, and restful sleep as well as eliminated pain and numbness.

The nerve pain treatment is performed with a technologically advanced  medical device called the Neurogenx 4000PRO: It is FDA-Cleared and patented as the only device of its kind. The Neurogenx treatment is unlike any other currently available. It is non-narcotic, non-surgical, and non-invasive. It uses a sophisticated electronic signal with a wide frequency band to successfully treat neuropathy symptoms at the cellular level. This helps restore function and feeling.

Results will vary but some patients feel a difference within the first couple of treatments. Studies have shown that this nerve pain treatment is up to 87% effective. In more than four out of five patients the Neurogenx treatment has helped with pain, numbness, burning, tingling and other symptoms associated with neuropathy.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle and Nuerogenx Nerve Center of St. Augustine we will do everything we can to help with the burning and tingling in the foot or toes you may be feeling and get you back to your regular activity. If you are experiencing burning and tingling in the foot please come see us as soon as possible. If you suspect you have diabetic neuropathy of the foot or are feeling pain in your foot or lower leg of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment at (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s Disease

Thomas A. LeBeau

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

Growing pains may sound like an old wives’ tale. In the case of Sever’s disease, though, your child’s growth spurt can lead to serious pain. It’s not actually a disease but a heel injury.

What Causes It?

During a growth spurt, your child’s heel bone grows faster than the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in her leg. In fact, the heel is one of your child’s first body parts to reach full adult size. When the muscles and tendons can’t grow fast enough to keep up, they are stretched too tight.

If your child is very active, especially if she plays a sport that involves a lot of running and jumping on hard surfaces (such as soccer, basketball, or gymnastics), it can put extra strain on her already overstretched tendons. This leads to swelling and pain at the point where the tendons attach to the growing part of her heel.

How Does It Affect Your Child?

Sever’s disease is more common in boys. They tend to have later growth spurts and typically get the condition between the ages of 10 and 15. In girls, it usually happens between 8 and 13.

Symptoms can include:

  • Pain, swelling, or redness in one or both heels
  • Tenderness and tightness in the back of the heel that feels worse when the area is squeezed
  • Heel pain that gets worse after running or jumping, and feels better after rest. The pain may be especially bad at the beginning of a sports season or when wearing hard, stiff shoes like soccer cleats.
  • Trouble walking
  • Walking or running with a limp or on tip toes

How Is It Treated?

The good news is that Sever’s disease doesn’t cause any long-term foot problems. Symptoms typically go away after a few months.

The best treatment is simply rest. Your child will need to stop or cut down on sports until the pain gets better. When she’s well enough to return to her sport, have her build up her playing time gradually.

Your doctor may also recommend:

  • Ice packs or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or naproxen, to relieve the pain
  • Supportive shoes and inserts that reduce stress on the heel bone. These can help if your child has another foot problem that aggravates Sever’s disease, such as flat feet or high arches.
  • Stretching and strengthening exercises, perhaps with the help of a physical therapist
  • In severe cases, your child may need a cast so her heel is forced to rest.

Can It Be Prevented?

Once your child’s growth spurt ends, and she’s reached full size, her Sever’s disease won’t return. Until then, the condition can happen again if your child stays very active.

Some simple steps can help prevent it. Have your child:

  • Wear supportive, shock-absorbing shoes.
  • Stretch her calves, heels, and hamstrings.
  • Not overdo it. Warn against over-training, and suggest plenty of rest, especially if she begins to feel pain in her heel.
  • Try to avoid lots of running and pounding on hard surfaces.
  • If she’s overweight, help her lose those extra pounds, which can increase pressure on her heels.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help your child with their heel pain and get them back to their regular activity. If you suspect your child has Sever’s disease or heel pain of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible at (904) 824-0869 or feel  free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

Wound Care

source ; http://www.staugustinefoot.com/blog/?p=425

 

Dr. Thomas LeBeau is a board certified Wound Care specialist.
Dr. Thomas LeBeau is a board certified Wound Care specialist.

Wound Care 

Dr. Thomas LeBeau

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

Foot ulcers and other open foot wounds are a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality.

Varicose veins, poor circulation and diabetes can lead to open foot wounds.

Approximately 15 percent of diabetic patients develop diabetic foot ulcers. Some even suffer foot amputations, many of which are preventable with proper foot wound care treatment.

Foot and ankle wounds can be caused by traumatic injury or could be arterial and venous wounds, pressure ulcers, diabetic wounds and wounds related to diseases such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and scleroderma. Older patients are also vulnerable to poor circulation, decreased sensation and impaired healing.

Wounds can be treated conservatively or aggressively depending on the severity. Like any ailment the best treatment is prevention. For example someone with diabetes should get on a diabetic foot care regiment. A regular diabetic foot care regiment will help prevent future problems that could not only include wounds but also amputations.  Diabetics should be on a diabetic foot care regiment no ifs, ands, or buts about it. However, if you have a foot ulcer/ foot wound that has already developed the sooner you are treated the better. Some foot wounds can be treated with wraps and antibiotics while others may require procedures and skin grafts. All of this often depends on the severity of the foot ulcer / foot wound and how soon it is treated.

Fortunately, wound care is a specialty of podiatry doctor Thomas A. LeBeau, DPM.

See Dr. LeBeau for foot and ankle wound care that includes:

• Foot ulcer treatment and other foot wound care treatment
• Leg ulcer treatment and other leg wound care treatment

Take a step toward saving your feet. Call Dr. LeBeau’s office today at 904-824-0869. Please feel free to use our online Request an Appointment at info@staugustinefoot.com