Broken Toe

source ; http://www.staugustinefoot.com/blog/?p=583

We are here to help with your broken toe.
We are here to help with your broken toe.

 

Broken Toe

Thomas A. LeBeau

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

What causes a broken toe (fracture), and what are the symptoms?

You may get a broken toe by stubbing it, dropping something on it, or bending it. A hairline crack (stress fracture) may occur after a sudden increase in activity, such as increased running or walking.

Symptoms of a broken toe may include:

  • A snap or pop at the time of the injury.
  • Pain that is worse when the toe is moved or touched.
  • Swelling and bruising.
  • Possible deformity (not just swelling), such as a toe pointing in the wrong direction or that is twisted out of normal position. A dislocated toe can also look deformed.
  • Decreased movement or movement that causes pain.

How is a broken toe diagnosed?

A broken toe is diagnosed through a physical examination. Your health professional will look for swelling, purple or black and blue spots, and tenderness. An X-ray may be needed to determine whether the toe is broken or dislocated.

How is it treated?

Home care after breaking a toe includes applying ice, elevating the foot, and rest. Medical treatment for a broken toe depends on which toe is broken, where in the toe the break is, and the severity of the break. If you do not have diabetes or peripheral arterial disease, your toe can be buddy-taped to your uninjured toe next to it. Protect the skin by putting some soft padding, such as felt or foam, between your toes before you tape them together. Your injured toe may need to be buddy-taped for 2 to 4 weeks to heal. If your injured toe hurts more after buddy taping it, remove the tape.

In rare cases, other treatment may be needed, including:

  • Protecting the toe from additional injury. This may include using splints to stabilize the toe, a short leg cast, or a brace.
    • Surgery, if the break is severe.

Medical treatment is needed more often for a broken big toe than for the other toes. An untreated fracture may cause long-term pain, limited movement, and deformity.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help with your broken toe and get you back to your regular activity. If you suspect you have a broken toe or are feeling pain in your foot or lower leg of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment at (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

 

 

Physical Therapy

source ; http://longevityptcenter.com/?p=849

Physical therapy is a great way to get you feeling better and back to your old self!
Physical therapy is a great way to get you feeling better and back to your old self!

Physical Therapy

Thomas A. LeBeau, DPM

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

 So what exactly is Physical Therapy?

Physical Therapy is the branch of the medical field that focuses on the treatment and reduction of pain.  Physical Therapy also focuses on returning function to ailing joints after surgery or injury. This is accomplished by using specific exercises and mechanical interventions (massage, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, heat, and ice, to name a few). The foundation of physical therapy is therapeutic exercise, functional training, manual (hands-on) therapy, and patient education.

While you may have had some exposure to this unique field through the media or have had a friend or family member who needed physical therapy after an injury, you might still have some questions about what a physical therapist does. Hopefully the following will offer some insight:

Depending on the particular needs of a patient, physical therapists prescribe exercises to help strengthen a particular area. A therapist may also mobilize a joint (that is, perform certain types of movements at the end of your range of motion). Massage may be used to promote proper movement and function. Physical therapists also use methods such as Ultrasound (which uses high frequency waves to produce heat), Electrical Stimulation (application of electrical waves to decrease inflammation, reduce pain, and improve circulation), hot packs, and ice, among other things. The combination of these techniques will promote healing. Partner this with your desire to do your best and you should be well on your way to recovery.

Although other kinds of practitioners will offer some of these treatments as “physical therapy,” it’s important for you to know that Physical Therapy can only be provided by qualified and licensed physical therapists (PTs) or by physical therapist assistants (PTAs). Licenses are acquired through the state and proof of graduation from an accredited physical therapy or PTA program.

All of the physical therapy providers in our practice are appropriately licensed and trained.

At St. Augusitne Foot and Ankle we provide physical therapy through our sister practice, Longevity Physical Therapy. If you are experiencing pain of any kind or have recently had surgery or an injury, please contact our physical therapy department at (904) 217-0520. Or you can email us at contact@longevityptcenter.com

We are here to help you heal and get back to your old self!

 

Running! Ready, Set, Go!

 source ; http://www.staugustinefoot.com/blog/?p=179

 

Time to start running!
Time to start running! Be safe!

 Running! Ready, Set, Go!

Thomas A. LeBeau, DPM

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

SPRING is here and it is time to get back out on the sidewalk, road, or beach and get running! Marathons, triathlons, and 5k events will scheduled weekly so it’s time to get ready!

Preparing for a road race or marathon is like preparing for an exam. You need to train and equip your body for the upcoming “test” ahead of you. Proper nutrition and training are just some of the usual things runners go through days or weeks before the event. Also, keeping your feet healthy for the big day is just as vital.

During training, it is important to give yourself and your feet time to get accustomed to the total distance covered by your race. Say you’re preparing yourself for a six-mile run. Gradually increase your running distance by a quarter-mile every week until you feel comfortable running the whole six miles. You can start by running a mile or two for the first two weeks. By the third and fourth weeks, increase that by another mile.

Most injuries associated with running involve the shin splints (pain behind the shin due to extreme pressure on the legs, which is usually common in runners and gymnasts) and pain in the iliotibial band—the connective muscles in the thighs. To avoid injuries, it is important to run properly. Former All-American track athlete Brendon Mahoney gives this advice: “Technique is the most important thing. Land on your mid-foot, not your heel. Keep your chest up and your core engaged, otherwise you’ll lose efficiency and run slower.” It is also important to stretch and warm up before running. Mahoney recommends leg swings to prepare your feet for the task. Between runs, leg exercises like squats help build strength and power.

While you are running this spring and summer and start feeling pain in your ankle or foot of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible. Our phone number is (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help with your foot or ankle injuries and get you back to your regular activity as soon as possible.

MRI: No More Claustrophobia!

source ; http://www.staugustinefoot.com/blog/mri-no-claustrophobia/

Dr Thomas LeBeau photo
MRI: No More Claustrophobia!

MRI: No More Claustrophobia!

Thomas A. LeBeau, DPM

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an imaging test that uses a magnetic field and pulses of radio wave energy to create detailed images of the body that are not usually visible with other diagnostic images. An MRI often gives different information about the body through the image than can be seen with an x-ray, ultrasound, or CT scan. As a podiatrist I may order an MRI to help me diagnose several types of issues including injuries like sprains and tears to bone infections like osteomyelitis.

An MRI requires the area of the body being studied to be placed inside a machine that contains a strong magnet. Usually these machines are very large and require the patient to lie in a tube or tightly enclosed area. Most often, regardless of what part of the body is being imaged, a patient must lay with their entire body enclosed in a tight space. Once positioned in the machine the imaging begins. A typical MRI will take 45-90 minutes to complete. The images from the MRI scan are digital and can be saved and stored on a computer for more study. Digital images can be viewed from virtually anywhere including on a home computer, tablet, and can even be shown in the operating room during surgery.

As mentioned earlier, most MRI machines require someone to lie in a tightly enclosed space. In podiatry, we typically only call for MRI images of the lower leg like the ankle or foot. At St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we questioned why it was necessary for our patient to lay entirely in a tight space when we are only imaging the lower leg. Based on patient feedback we found that this can be very uncomfortable. To address this concern for our patients and provide a better service we invested in an extremity only MRI machine. This type of machine only requires you to put your leg into an enclosed space as opposed to the entire body. After two years of using this machine we have found that our patients are far more comfortable. This has allowed us to perform more MRI’s on patients that would normally prefer not to. Further, this has led to improved care because we have been able to diagnose problems that we would not be able to without the MRI and also make the diagnosis much more quickly. That’s a great win for our patients!

MRI: No More Claustrophobia!
MRI: No More Claustrophobia!

If your doctor has requested that you get an MRI performed on your leg (knee, ankle, foot) or your arm (elbow, wrist, hand) and you are anxious about lying in a tightly enclosed space, please give us a call so we can help! Once we complete the MRI we can get the image to your doctor in about 24 hours time.  Or if you prefer to work with us on your lower extremity issue we can do that also.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to make you feel comfortable so your MRI can be performed without issue.  If you are in need of an MRI or if you are feeling pain in your foot or ankle of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible at (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com.