Plantar Fasciitis “The Scoop”

plantar fasciitis
Dr. Thomas LeBeau seeing a patient for plantar fasciitis.

Safe, reliable relief from disabling foot pain (Plantar fasciitis).

With heel pain or plantar fasciitis, also known as foot pain, the bottom of your foot may hurt when you stand, especially after you get out of bed first thing in the morning. Without a heel pain diagnosis and heel pain treatment, plantar fasciitis can lead to painful heel spurs and chronic disabling pain. Over-pronation (flatfeet) is the leading cause of heal pain. Your arch can collapse from weight-bearing, causing the plantar fascia to stretch away from the heel bone. When you stand, your plantar fascia is pulled tight like a bowstring. During a long rest, the plantar fascia contracts back to its original shape and your pain is reduced.

Heal Pain can be caused by any number of things including poorly fitting shoes, over use (too much walking or running), barefoot walking or running, being over-weight, a foot injury, and/or genetics among other things. Untreated foot pain could also lead to other discomfort such as knee pain, hip pain, and back pain. Getting help and relief from plantar fasciitis and/or heel pain is key to avoiding other uncomfortable and painful issues.

Plantar fasciitis is also called heel spur syndrome. It can be treated by using a variety of conservative approaches such as anti-inflammatory medicines, orthotic shoe inserts and foot physical therapy modalities (heat, ice, massage and therapeutic exercise). Any number or combination of conservative treatments could relieve you of your pain.

With the experience and skill of podiatrist Thomas A. LeBeau, DPM and his staff at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle, you could walk away from plantar fasciitis without surgery. Getting you back on your feet is the top priority. So for lasting relief, call 904-824-0869. Please feel free to use our online ‘Request an Appointment’ form.

Nerve Pain Treatment: Neurogenx

source ;  http://www.staugustinefoot.com/2016/04/25/nerve-pain-treatment-neurogenx/

Nerve Pain Treatment: Neurogenx  

Thomas A. LeBeau

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

What is the Neurogenx nerve pain treatment?

It is a breakthrough electromedical nerve pain treatment proven to effectively alleviate the pain, tingling, burning, and numbness resulting from neuropathy and chronic nerve conditions. This nerve pain treatment can successfully help resolve neuropathy symptoms and nerve pain of varying intensities in different areas of the body. Neurogenx patients have improved sensation, range of motion, balance, and restful sleep as well as eliminated pain and numbness.

The nerve pain treatment is performed with a technologically advanced  medical device called the Neurogenx 4000PRO: It is FDA-Cleared and patented as the only device of its kind. The Neurogenx treatment is unlike any other currently available. It is non-narcotic, non-surgical, and non-invasive. It uses a sophisticated electronic signal with a wide frequency band to successfully treat neuropathy symptoms at the cellular level. This helps restore function and feeling.

Results will vary but some patients feel a difference within the first couple of treatments. Studies have shown that this nerve pain treatment is up to 87% effective. In more than four out of five patients the Neurogenx treatment has helped with pain, numbness, burning, tingling and other symptoms associated with neuropathy.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle and Nuerogenx Nerve Center of St. Augustine we will do everything we can to help with the burning and tingling in the foot or toes you may be feeling and get you back to your regular activity. If you are experiencing burning and tingling in the foot please come see us as soon as possible. If you suspect you have diabetic neuropathy of the foot or are feeling pain in your foot or lower leg of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment at (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

Neuropathy

 

sourse ; http://www.staugustinefoot.com/blog/?p=614

 

Neuropathy

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

Neuropathy is an umbrella term that denotes a disorder of the peripheral nervous system. The peripheral nervous system consists of all the motor and sensory nerves that connect the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body.

How Is Neuropathy Diagnosed?

If your doctor suspects you may have a form of neuropathy, he or she will begin by taking a history of your symptoms and examining you for signs of muscle weakness, numbness, and impaired reflexes. You may need blood and urine tests to check for diabetes, vitamin or metabolic deficiencies and the presence of any underlying disease or genetic defect that may be affecting you. You’ll also need to take a serious look at your alcohol intake and what medications you are taking.

You may also be given an electromyogram (EMG) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) tests, which is used to assess nerve and muscle function and measure the electrical properties of the nerves. Using these tests, doctors can often pinpoint the abnormal nerves and determine which part of their structure is damaged.

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Nerve and muscle biopsies may also be performed and may provide valuable information about the type and cause of the neuropathy. A spinal tap, or lumbar puncture, is sometimes recommended to help identify infection or inflammation that might be associated with the neuropathy.

What Are the Treatments for Neuropathy?

Effective treatment of peripheral neuropathy relies heavily on the cause of the nerve damage. For example, a peripheral neuropathy caused by a vitamin deficiency can be treated — even reversed — with vitamin therapy and an improved diet. Likewise, nerve damage brought on by alcohol abuse can often be stopped and improved by avoiding alcohol. Peripheral neuropathy caused by toxic substances or medications can often be corrected in much the same way. When neuropathy is related to diabetes, careful monitoring of blood sugar levels may slow its progression and curb symptoms. Physical therapy will help strengthen weak muscles and improve quality of life in almost all cases. Early diagnosis and treatment of peripheral neuropathy is important, because the peripheral nerves have a limited capacity to regenerate, and treatment may only stop the progression — not reverse damage.

How Can Peripheral Neuropathy Be Prevented?

Some forms of peripheral neuropathy can be averted by maintaining sound health habits. Eating a nutritious diet, exercising regularly, and abstaining from excessive alcohol consumption can all help prevent nerve damage. Avoiding injuries and toxic chemicals and carefully managing underlying disorders, such as diabetes, can also help prevent peripheral neuropathy.

With the experience of Dr. Thomas LeBeau at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help with your neuropathy diagnosis and get you back to your regular activity. If you are experiencing burning and tingling in the foot please come see us as soon as possible. If you suspect you have neuropathy of the lower leg or are feeling pain in your foot or lower leg of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment at (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

 

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s Disease

Thomas A. LeBeau

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

Growing pains may sound like an old wives’ tale. In the case of Sever’s disease, though, your child’s growth spurt can lead to serious pain. It’s not actually a disease but a heel injury.

What Causes It?

During a growth spurt, your child’s heel bone grows faster than the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in her leg. In fact, the heel is one of your child’s first body parts to reach full adult size. When the muscles and tendons can’t grow fast enough to keep up, they are stretched too tight.

If your child is very active, especially if she plays a sport that involves a lot of running and jumping on hard surfaces (such as soccer, basketball, or gymnastics), it can put extra strain on her already overstretched tendons. This leads to swelling and pain at the point where the tendons attach to the growing part of her heel.

How Does It Affect Your Child?

Sever’s disease is more common in boys. They tend to have later growth spurts and typically get the condition between the ages of 10 and 15. In girls, it usually happens between 8 and 13.

Symptoms can include:

  • Pain, swelling, or redness in one or both heels
  • Tenderness and tightness in the back of the heel that feels worse when the area is squeezed
  • Heel pain that gets worse after running or jumping, and feels better after rest. The pain may be especially bad at the beginning of a sports season or when wearing hard, stiff shoes like soccer cleats.
  • Trouble walking
  • Walking or running with a limp or on tip toes

How Is It Treated?

The good news is that Sever’s disease doesn’t cause any long-term foot problems. Symptoms typically go away after a few months.

The best treatment is simply rest. Your child will need to stop or cut down on sports until the pain gets better. When she’s well enough to return to her sport, have her build up her playing time gradually.

Your doctor may also recommend:

  • Ice packs or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or naproxen, to relieve the pain
  • Supportive shoes and inserts that reduce stress on the heel bone. These can help if your child has another foot problem that aggravates Sever’s disease, such as flat feet or high arches.
  • Stretching and strengthening exercises, perhaps with the help of a physical therapist
  • In severe cases, your child may need a cast so her heel is forced to rest.

Can It Be Prevented?

Once your child’s growth spurt ends, and she’s reached full size, her Sever’s disease won’t return. Until then, the condition can happen again if your child stays very active.

Some simple steps can help prevent it. Have your child:

  • Wear supportive, shock-absorbing shoes.
  • Stretch her calves, heels, and hamstrings.
  • Not overdo it. Warn against over-training, and suggest plenty of rest, especially if she begins to feel pain in her heel.
  • Try to avoid lots of running and pounding on hard surfaces.
  • If she’s overweight, help her lose those extra pounds, which can increase pressure on her heels.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help your child with their heel pain and get them back to their regular activity. If you suspect your child has Sever’s disease or heel pain of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible at (904) 824-0869 or feel  free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com