Neuropathy

 

sourse ; http://www.staugustinefoot.com/blog/?p=614

 

Neuropathy

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

Neuropathy is an umbrella term that denotes a disorder of the peripheral nervous system. The peripheral nervous system consists of all the motor and sensory nerves that connect the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body.

How Is Neuropathy Diagnosed?

If your doctor suspects you may have a form of neuropathy, he or she will begin by taking a history of your symptoms and examining you for signs of muscle weakness, numbness, and impaired reflexes. You may need blood and urine tests to check for diabetes, vitamin or metabolic deficiencies and the presence of any underlying disease or genetic defect that may be affecting you. You’ll also need to take a serious look at your alcohol intake and what medications you are taking.

You may also be given an electromyogram (EMG) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) tests, which is used to assess nerve and muscle function and measure the electrical properties of the nerves. Using these tests, doctors can often pinpoint the abnormal nerves and determine which part of their structure is damaged.

Recommended Related to Brain & Nervous System

General Information About Pituitary Tumors

A pituitary tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the pituitary gland. Pituitary tumors form in the pituitary gland, a pea-sized organ in the center of the brain, just above the back of the nose. The pituitary gland is sometimes called the “master endocrine gland” because it makes hormones that affect the way many parts of the body work. It also controls hormones made by many other glands in the body. Anatomy of the inside of the brain, showing the pineal and pituitary glands, optic…

Read the General Information About Pituitary Tumors article > >

Nerve and muscle biopsies may also be performed and may provide valuable information about the type and cause of the neuropathy. A spinal tap, or lumbar puncture, is sometimes recommended to help identify infection or inflammation that might be associated with the neuropathy.

What Are the Treatments for Neuropathy?

Effective treatment of peripheral neuropathy relies heavily on the cause of the nerve damage. For example, a peripheral neuropathy caused by a vitamin deficiency can be treated — even reversed — with vitamin therapy and an improved diet. Likewise, nerve damage brought on by alcohol abuse can often be stopped and improved by avoiding alcohol. Peripheral neuropathy caused by toxic substances or medications can often be corrected in much the same way. When neuropathy is related to diabetes, careful monitoring of blood sugar levels may slow its progression and curb symptoms. Physical therapy will help strengthen weak muscles and improve quality of life in almost all cases. Early diagnosis and treatment of peripheral neuropathy is important, because the peripheral nerves have a limited capacity to regenerate, and treatment may only stop the progression — not reverse damage.

How Can Peripheral Neuropathy Be Prevented?

Some forms of peripheral neuropathy can be averted by maintaining sound health habits. Eating a nutritious diet, exercising regularly, and abstaining from excessive alcohol consumption can all help prevent nerve damage. Avoiding injuries and toxic chemicals and carefully managing underlying disorders, such as diabetes, can also help prevent peripheral neuropathy.

With the experience of Dr. Thomas LeBeau at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help with your neuropathy diagnosis and get you back to your regular activity. If you are experiencing burning and tingling in the foot please come see us as soon as possible. If you suspect you have neuropathy of the lower leg or are feeling pain in your foot or lower leg of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment at (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

 

St. Augustine Podiatrist Joins UCF Faculty

Source ; http://www.staugustinefoot.com/blog/?p=220

Assistant Professor of Podiatric Medicine
Assistant Professor of Podiatric Medicine

St. Augustine Podiatrist Joins UCF Faculty

St. Augustine podiatrist, Thomas LeBeau, has joined the University of Central Florida College of Medicine faculty as an Assistant Professor of Podiatric Medicine. Dr. LeBeau brings over twenty-five years of experience to the UCF staff, six of which have been spent practicing in St. Augustine, Florida at the St. Augustine Foot and Ankle podiatry practice. The practice is located at 1 St. Johns Medical Park Dr. St. Augustine, FL 32086.

The University of Central Florida College of Medicine was founded in 2006 about 100 miles from St. Augustine by way of Interstate 95 and Interstate 4. Just an hour and a half drive from the school, Dr. LeBeau will provide support to other faculty, staff, and students, from St. Augustine, in the field of podiatric medicine. Dr. LeBeau’s specialties include the treatment of injuries such as strains and sprains, diabetic foot care, diabetic neuropathy treatment, wound care, bunion and hammertoe correction, treatment for heel pain and foot pain, treatment for corn and calluses, ingrown toenail removal, and ligament/tendon repair among many others.  Visit the St. Augustine Foot and Ankle website (www.staugustinefoot.com) for additional details.

“Working with the University of Central Florida College of Medicine is such an honor. From what I have seen so far, they are providing a top notch medical education to our future podiatrists, primary care providers, and other physicians. I am very much looking forward to being a part of that.” says Dr. LeBeau. When asked how being a faculty member will enhance his own practice he said, “Teaching and interacting with faculty and students from a state of the art medical school like this will help keep me informed on the latest medical techniques and technologies available to my patients. I’ll also have the latest medical information at my finger tips via the Harriet F. Ginsburg Health Sciences Library internet portal. With that type of access to information, you can’t help but serve your patients better. I am really looking forward to that also.”

For any questions about Dr. LeBeau or his practice please contact St. Augustine Foot and Ankle through their website (www.staugustinefoot.com) or by phone at (904) 824-0869.

Bunions: What to Expect

source ; http://www.staugustinefoot.com/blog/?p=187

Here to help you with your bunions!
Here to help you with your bunions!

 

Bunions: What to Expect

Thomas A. LeBeau, DPM

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

 

A bunion (hallux valgus) is an enlargement of the joint at the base of the big toe that forms when the bone and support tissue move out of place. This forces the big toe to bend toward the others, causing an often painful lump on the inside foot.

Bunion — from the Latin “bunion,” meaning enlargement — can also occur on the outside of the foot along the little toe, where it is called a “bunionette” or “tailor’s bunion.” Although bunions tend to run in families, it is the foot type that is passed down — not the bunion. Other causes of bunions are foot injuries, neuromuscular disorders and congenital deformities.

You may get bunions if:

  • The way your foot is shaped puts too much pressure on your big toe joint. Because bunions can run in families, some experts believe that the inherited shape of the foot makes some people more likely to get them.
  • Your foot rolls inward too much when you walk. A moderate amount of inward roll, or pronation, is normal. But damage and injury can happen with too much pronation.
  • You have flat feet.
  • You often wear shoes that are too tight.

At St. Augustine Foot and Ankle, we will ask questions about your past health and carefully examine your toe and joint. Some of the questions might be: When did the bunions start? What activities or shoes make your bunions worse? Do any other joints hurt? We will examine your toe and joint and check range of motion. This is done while you are sitting and while you are standing so that we may see the toe and joint at rest and while bearing weight

X-rays are often used to check for bone problems or to rule out other causes of pain and swelling. An MRI may be ordered if there is a suspicion of soft tissue damage. Other tests, such as blood tests are sometimes done to check for other problems that can cause joint pain and swelling. These problems might include gout, rheumatoid arthritis, or joint infection.

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help with your bunions and get you back to your regular activity. If you suspect you have a bunion or are feeling pain in your ankle or foot of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible at (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

 

Some of the information above was found at www.WebMD.com

Running! Ready, Set, Go!

 source ; http://www.staugustinefoot.com/blog/?p=179

 

Time to start running!
Time to start running! Be safe!

 Running! Ready, Set, Go!

Thomas A. LeBeau, DPM

St. Augustine Foot and Ankle

SPRING is here and it is time to get back out on the sidewalk, road, or beach and get running! Marathons, triathlons, and 5k events will scheduled weekly so it’s time to get ready!

Preparing for a road race or marathon is like preparing for an exam. You need to train and equip your body for the upcoming “test” ahead of you. Proper nutrition and training are just some of the usual things runners go through days or weeks before the event. Also, keeping your feet healthy for the big day is just as vital.

During training, it is important to give yourself and your feet time to get accustomed to the total distance covered by your race. Say you’re preparing yourself for a six-mile run. Gradually increase your running distance by a quarter-mile every week until you feel comfortable running the whole six miles. You can start by running a mile or two for the first two weeks. By the third and fourth weeks, increase that by another mile.

Most injuries associated with running involve the shin splints (pain behind the shin due to extreme pressure on the legs, which is usually common in runners and gymnasts) and pain in the iliotibial band—the connective muscles in the thighs. To avoid injuries, it is important to run properly. Former All-American track athlete Brendon Mahoney gives this advice: “Technique is the most important thing. Land on your mid-foot, not your heel. Keep your chest up and your core engaged, otherwise you’ll lose efficiency and run slower.” It is also important to stretch and warm up before running. Mahoney recommends leg swings to prepare your feet for the task. Between runs, leg exercises like squats help build strength and power.

While you are running this spring and summer and start feeling pain in your ankle or foot of any kind please give us a call to set an appointment as soon as possible. Our phone number is (904) 824-0869 or feel free to email us at info@staugustinefoot.com

With our experience at St. Augustine Foot and Ankle we will do everything we can to help with your foot or ankle injuries and get you back to your regular activity as soon as possible.